Paravalesque

Parabolas: A plane curve formed by a mathematical equation.
Carnivalesque: Characteristic of, suitable for, or like a carnival.

Paravalesque is a portmanteau a combining of the two above words. Fascinated by the curved shapes of flowing carinal costumes of the Caribbean, Glenis set out to make works that celebrate the movement and color, the feast of textures and rhythm present at carnivals worldwide. The movement and patterns that flow through the streets at these times of celebration are a source of endless inspiration.

The Moko Jumbie dancer (Caribbean stilt-walker) often emerges at these events. She represents the modern man, a perpetual figure of old reclaimed. Through these performance actions in Shanghai and Beijing, she is now seen roving the streets of China. As she takes each tittering step, she engages in mapping her past, while reaching higher and higher towards her future in ever-growing stilts.

This body of work includes the roving Moko Jumbie in the specially designed costume as well as a series of paintings and sculptures.

The Money Tree Revival Animation

Money-Tree-Title-PageThe Money Tree Revival Project is a unique blend of Chinese and African American traditions. While modeling an African American Revival church service, the performers sweep the audience up into the revival ritual. They chant and repeat over and over that they can turn hair into money!  As the performers make this impossible claim, participants are encouraged to give strands of hair, as much as they can muster to be collected into a basket.  After collection, the hair is woven into coins using a Chinese knotting method, and used to adorn a small money tree. A trial run was performed last year around the winter solstice. Future development of the idea includes a performance in the Bazaar art space in Shanghai. An animation was created to be played while the performance is taking place.

The images below are a preview of the animation 🙂