My Third Marriage

Objects Used in the Project
Recent Performance Projects Objects
Staging The Other Half 01
Staging The Other Half 02
Staging The Other Half 03
Staging The Other Half 04
Staging The Other Half 05
Take a Picture With the Bride 01
Take a Picture With the Bride 02
Happy Halloween Grrrr!

Third time’s a charm they say, and I wholeheartedly agree. Although I’ve been married 3 times  I still have the same husband. Our first wedding was in Ethiopia during the new millennium celebration in September 2007, the beginning of the year 2000 according to the ancient Ethiopian calendar. We were married again that same year in New York, the most legal, even if less festive celebration. Our marriage is a happy and fruitful one. So why get married again?

My third marriage was not to Lester. I committed my life in a formal way to the activity that has been the driving force of my life for as long as I can remember. Creating Art. In the performance piece “The Other Half” I wore a wedding dress to show my commitment to the solemn thank-less duty of producing artwork.

The dress I wore is store bought off the rack in China, but very special. During the performance while wearing the dress, I asked the audience to go underneath my shirt to see what makes this ordinary dress  really unique. Underneath is a collection of objects and materials arranged to tell a story of my recent journey as an artist. The audience is invited to spend time and explore all the nooks and crannies, take what they can remove , and photograph themselves with me from my most intimate side.

I guess the reason I was thinking about wedding dresses is because Lester and I have started an online store selling dresses for brides, bridesmaids, flower girls and mothers, all made to their size. Check it out. Tell your friends and their friends. You could even become an agent and make some money. Click on the link to visit the site: www.weddingdressforyou.com.

 

Her Hair Must be Fake AND The Shanghai Biennale

Educating the Masses on black hair

Educating the Masses on black hairThe grand opening of the Shanghai Biennial is fast approaching. The main curator organizing this massage production is also the main adviser for my masters degree program at China Academy of Art, Professor Qiu Zhijie  (邱志杰). The biennial will be in the brand new museum for modern art in Shanghai, the first exhibition held in this space. The existing factory space has been renovated and the new work is currently being installed.

The biennial’s framework has also been expanded this year for the first time to include several project outside the museum space, such as, the City Pavilion project and the Zhongshan Park project. In professor Qiu’s opinion, representing one’s city in this exhibition carries even more significance than representing one’s country and yet doesn’t present as strong of a political statement.

There will be about 28 cities represented, and I will be helping to build the Pittsburgh pavilion. Tomorrow the heavy work begins. I’ll update you on the progress.

The Shanghai Biennial is the reason I am away from home and free to write this blog post, but weather in Shanghai or Hangzhou, my experience walking on the street in China remains a constant challenge. Today as I stopped to buy a snack from a man selling wraps on the street, I lamented the fact that everyone constantly comments on my hair. The problem is the inevitable question and often belligerent and incorrect answer: “Is her hair real or fake?” “Of course it’s fake! It must be fake!”

It really maddens me that everyone believes my hair is fake. So much so that the question is rebuffed as a stupid one. And then there are the constant giggles and comments about my skin color. Women in China go to extreme lengths to prevent their skin from getting tanned. They prefer pearly white skin as a status symbol.

One of my friends in the art program, a tall and handsome white  man from France pointed out that the issues of hair and skin are prevalent also in the black community. He says he always has to deal with people commenting on how tall he is. I don’t think he gets it. I guess I’ll have to take him out for a 30 minute walk one day. When people see two of us walking together as a couple, I’m sure he’ll begin to understand the depth of the problem.

I of course talk with tons of people everyday about where I am from and let them touch my hair. Today a woman in the restaurant where I ate dinner counted out my dreads. Apparently I have 220 dread locks. That was a fun interaction. On the 15 minute walk home I told myself that I should just focus on things like this and ignore everything else. It worked for about 5 minutes. A few people passed and stared, the usual question rang out. Ok, I can handle it. Then a couple passed by. The guy said, “Oh a black women.” After a few seconds they started to laugh loudly. I just can’t understand why that was so f—ing funny.